Kathyrn Bowling’s son Gus was only two weeks old when she first noticed red bumps spreading on his face: newborn acne. At the time, the Atlanta mom wasn’t concerned about something so common (and harmless) as baby acne. I was worried about so many other things, like how much he was eating and whether I would get enough sleep,” she says. “In the grand scheme of things, a few bumps on his face didn’t seem too bad.”
© 2019 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and  Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement  (updated 5/25/18). SELF may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. Your California Privacy Rights. SELF does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Any information published on this website or by this brand is not intended as a substitute for medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.   The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices 

Blackheads appear as small black dots on the skin. They usually occur on the face – especially the nose and T-Zone – but can also be seen on the back, neck, chest, shoulders and arms. Blackheads are one of two types of comedones, or acne lesions caused by clogged pores. Blackhead comedones are open versus closed, leaving the plug at the top of the clogged pore exposed to air on the skin’s surface. It’s this exposure to oxygen that accounts for their color, which can not only be black but also gray, yellow or brown. When melanin – a pigment produced by oil glands and found within sebum – makes contact with air, it oxidizes and turns dark. Blackheads are a mild, usually painless form of acne, as there’s less inflammation associated with this type of lesion.
If you're willing to invest in some serious skincare to soothe your acne-prone skin woes, Lancer's blemish-control polish is a great addition to your skincare routine. This treatment can be used as an exfoliant in conjunction with the best spot treatment for your acne type to further treat severe acne and improve the overall appearance of blemishes.

Castor oil has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties that can speed up healing, making it ideal for breakout-prone skin. Though I recommend using it in very small amounts with jojoba oil, hemp seed oil or coconut oil, along with one of the essential oils above, it’s high in unsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E, proteins and minerals, which can help reduce acne-causing bacteria and inflammation associated with breakouts. It can even help heal scars caused by acne.

Therefore, it is very important that you wear sunscreen everyday, with an SPF of 30.Of note, after SPF 30, there are decreasing marginal returns in UVB protection. The % of UVB protection as a function of SPF Value is a log graph and plateaus after SPF 30. Therefore, there is not much difference in protection between SPF 40 and 50. Sunscreens with an SPF 100 are banned in some countries.
Kathyrn Bowling’s son Gus was only two weeks old when she first noticed red bumps spreading on his face: newborn acne. At the time, the Atlanta mom wasn’t concerned about something so common (and harmless) as baby acne. I was worried about so many other things, like how much he was eating and whether I would get enough sleep,” she says. “In the grand scheme of things, a few bumps on his face didn’t seem too bad.”

Lavender oil is another favorite of mine, not only because it can help prevent and keeps acne at bay, but it smells amazing, and provides relaxation qualities — something much needed in today’s world. Lavender helps regenerate skin cells, minimize sun spots and even reduce scarring caused by acne. Additionally, it can help reduce swelling and inflammation that may be caused by acne due to the polysaccharides it contains. (20) 

Acne treatment that you apply to the skin: Most acne treatments are applied to the skin. Your dermatologist may call this topical treatment. There are many topical acne treatments. Some topicals help kill the bacteria. Others work on reducing the oil. The topical medicine may contain a retinoid, prescription-strength benzoyl peroxide, antibiotic, or even salicylic acid. Your dermatologist will determine what you need.
×